Monday, December 22, 2008

Misheard (Christmas) lyrics

I went to my town's Messiah "sing-along" this evening. They had scores to borrow at the door. I'm not very good at sight-singing, but I hit a few (correct) notes. I wished more that I was in the orchestra than in the choir.

A couple years ago, I got my own recording of the complete Messiah. It came with the full set of words and scripture references. It adds so much to be able to appreciate the production as a worshipful piece. I like how it tells the whole story of Christ's coming, from the prophecies to His death and resurrection.

If you like listening to the Messiah, I would recommend looking closely at the text. I, for one, often mishear lyrics, and I honestly had no idea what most of the songs were about, aside from the Hallelujah's. Here's one of them I misheard:

"He's raising...the lucky ones."

Real text: "the dead shall be raised incorruptible." (1 Cor. 15:52) Wow, talk about the wrong idea. That would make for interesting theology if it had anything to do with luck. :)

Of course, that may or may not be worse than thinking that Michael W. Smith was singing about "loose fatties" rather than "lux venit." Glad I got that one straightened out.

4 comments:

  1. For years I thought that "Theres a bad moon on the rise" was "There's a bathroom on the right."

    My daughter Lydia entered a Christmas card contest we had at church, and featured a picture of two angels. One was labeled "Gloria", the other "Harold". Turns out she thought that those words were the angels' names!

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  2. I think the "bathroom on the right" one is common. I find that song lyrics tend to be fairly ambiguous anyway, so the misheard version tends to make more sense than the real lyrics. What is a "bad moon," anyway? There are some websites with commonly misheard lyrics that are good for a laugh.

    Who knows, maybe there IS an angel named "Harold." :)

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  3. Kids' misunderstandings of prayers are funny, too. I had a little boy recently pray the Hail Mary and say, "Play with us sinners, now and at the hour of our death." I like that idea. I wonder what he pictures himself playing with Mary?

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