Friday, May 16, 2008

Airport procedure

I'm still waiting to be enlightened on what to expect when I land in Kinshasa. So I decided to do a little investigating on my own, with the help of Google.

Here's the first article I opened:


"Legend has it that when an aircraft becomes too sick or too old to manage on it's own, the other aircraft in the herd sense its distress. At an appointed hour they accompany it on a very long journey to the hidden aircraft burial grounds somewhere deep in the jungle. That hidden aircraft burial ground is called: Kinshasa Airport..."

Ummm. Reading on...

"Upon arrival at Kinshasa, you find your way into the large arrival area. There are four or five immigration booths where immigration officers stamp your passport. After working your way through the line you will pass through a large door into the customs/baggage claim area. There will be numerous apparent loafers around the door, and they may ask to see your passport. Some of these are, indeed, loafers and others are security agents. Ask to see identification before allowing anyone to gain possession of your passport. After baggage claim, you will present your baggage to the customs officer for inspection. Be very careful that your passport does not contain any visa or stamp from Burundi, Rwanda, or Uganda as a state of hostility exists between those countries and the DRC. "

More.

1 comment:

  1. Yipes. Elizabeth - I never would have had the wits to check things out ahead of time. I hope a LOT that you can continue your blog and describe your trip. Undoubtedly it will be even more dramatic than the trip to Moscow! Continue with your Chesterton, perhaps it will help you maintain your powers of observation! (Which may proved to be quite useful!)

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