Wednesday, July 3, 2013

My day

I was riding a regular city bus (the kind I have a pass for), when someone suddenly handed me a pie. I looked around and it looked like other passengers were being given them, too. Interesting.

When I got off at my stop, I noticed that there were several stations where prizes were being handed out, like it was a holiday. Everyone was sort of giddy. The various prizes seemed too unrelated for it to be a business promotion. I called a friend to see what she thought, and she said "the government is getting people revved up. Something is about to happen."

I got home and an unfamiliar scarf hanging from our coat hooks caught my eye. Someone was in the apartment. 

A peppy college-aged girl suddenly showed up and came right over to David and started examining him, almost like it was a house call, only I hadn't called the doctor. I had the feeling that I had to pretend like everything was normal, so that they wouldn't know I was on to them. The girl asked the same questions that the pediatrician asked. At one point she asked me how much he weighed, and I shuffled through some papers to find his latest print-out from the pediatrician, but for some reason his weight had not been recorded.

By this time, some other "nurses" had arrived on the scene, and were starting to examine David as well. Then it got even weirder as other mothers and children started to enter our apartment, and I realized that our apartment was being taken over to be used as some sort of base. I made small talk with one woman who had a boy close to David's age, but we knew intuitively that we couldn't discuss what was really going on.

While they were performing more tests on David, I decided to sneak downtown. I went into one store that had some housewares, and a clerk offered some advice. He was just a young college guy like the girl that was in my apartment examining David. He seemed so casual that I almost felt like I could relax and joke around with him, but I knew that he was really with the government. They had purposely chosen these youngsters so that people would be more likely to let their guard down.

I got back to my apartment and the nurses were spoon-feeding David from a jar. "Excuse me, what are you feeding him?" I asked, without even taking my shoes off. I looked at the contents and saw that it was spaghetti. "But he hasn't tried tomato products yet," I protested, though I didn't try too hard to argue.

Finally, Andrei was home. We had to decide together what to do. We were being watched. As we looked out the window, we saw a man walking along, holding a weapon. Then another man came along, also armed. Shots rang out, and we knew that it was only the beginning.



Now THAT was an intense dream.



4 comments:

  1. Haha, what a crazy dream! I've been having a lot of dreams lately...I think it must be because I'm sleeping longer stretches now.

    Caught up on your other posts...hope you have a wonderful and refreshing visit back in the U.S!

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    1. I thought I had heard that the dreams you remember are the ones you had when you're not sleeping very soundly, or that's the only time when you actually dream, or something. Some of my weirdest ones are if I go back to sleep late in the morning, or take a nap during the day.

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  2. The fun question is - so, reading this, WHEN did you realize it was a dream? Well, for me it was almost the first sentence - pie? They don't' eat PIE in Russia! And, if it were perogi, she would have said so.

    Hm...the news must be getting to you! Or, those Russian pediatricians!

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    1. Of course it was a PIROG! I'm not sure if the dream was in English or Russian.

      It was a few days ago, so I've already forgotten my initial reaction. But all these topics had come up in conversation, for sure.

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